Surface Finishes

Surfaces are gaining popularity over time owing to their low maintenance and less visibility of stains, fingerprints and watermarks. The process of leathering preserves the natural sheen of the stone making it appear less glossy as compared to the polished finish. The leathered finish is increasingly embraced by homeowners for their kitchen and countertops. The finish is obtained by moving diamond-tipped brushes across the surface rendering it the look and feel of textured leather. It makes the surface less porous, easier to clean and smooth and pleasant to touch

  • Stone Maintenance-1
  • Stone Maintenance-2
  • Stone Maintenance-3

Leathered

Leathered surfaces are gaining popularity over time owing to their low maintenance and less visibility of stains, fingerprints and watermarks. The process of leathering preserves the natural sheen of the stone making it appear less glossy as compared to the polished finish. The leathered finish is increasingly embraced by homeowners for their kitchen and countertops. The finish is obtained by moving diamond-tipped brushes across the surface rendering it the look and feel of textured leather. It makes the surface less porous, easier to clean and smooth and pleasant to touch.

Sandblasted

Sandblasting your countertops with a high-pressure jet helps to even out their surfaces. Commonly known as ‘abrasive blasting’, the technique erodes the surface layer of the material, leaving it with an attractive, rustic surface. It is popular among homeowners because it is simple to clean and does not sustain damage easily. It will also help you remove any impurities or rust on the surface. The abrasion smoothes out the surface while giving it a matte finish. While the color of cement will be dominant in the beginning, this will change as the process continues. Eventually, the material will take on a sandy tone, evening it out to make the look more appealing.

Polished

Due to its tendency towards high gloss, the ‘polished furnish’ is usually applied to granite. However, it can also be applied to a variety of other materials, including stone and concrete. The polishing makes the surface shine so that it becomes a centerpiece in your kitchen. Due to this, some homeowners may choose to use only the polished granite for the surfaces of their kitchen island.

 

The process involves buffing the concrete as much as possible. This smoothens out the material, giving it a naturally shiny appearance. Polished surfaces give off a rich, sumptuous look, with a diverse color scheme.

Honed

Recently, the choice of a ‘honed finish’ has become popular in the kitchen, as it gives a soft appearance. While the process involves the polished finish, the manufacturer will not ‘buff’ or ‘polish’ it to that extent.

Despite this, the surface will still be smooth, though it will give a slightly dull look. This can be advantageous as the lack of ‘glossy surface’ makes the countertop highly scratch-resistant. When honed, a material will be non-reflective, developing a more satiny finish. The finish is a preferred choice for some homeowners, as it does not affect the natural color or pattern of the material.

Flamed and Brushed

A flamed and brushed finish is quite popular due to its practicality. The high temperature applied to the material causes the material to become slip resistant. Commonly used on granite, the process effectively covers any imperfections on the surface or the stone. It also gives the surface a natural, slightly faded look that the other polishes may not create.

If it is applied to a stone surface with a yellow tone, the oxidation process will give the material a pale red or orange look. This makes this furnish an attractive choice for some homeowners, as it causes a dramatic effect on a surface with softer colors.

Bush-Hammered

The ‘bush hammered’ process is a popular choice for a countertop finish. It reduces the chances of staining on the surface, while the grazing makes the surface slip resistant, which is ideal for usage in the kitchen. It also ensures resistance to acidic liquid, like lemon and tomato juice. If these liquids come into contact with the countertops, they won’t lose their sheen or sustain damage due to acidity. The technique gets its name from the tool that manufacturers use—a bush hammer. It produces small indentations in the surface, giving it a textured finish. It also lightens the color of the material and dulls its natural pattern.